Florence (Day Three)

After a good sleep, we decided to investigate a new section if town. Yen had noticed the domes of the synagogue from the cathedral domes yesterday, so we headed over. Here you can see it peeking up above an alley.

Unfortunately there are no photos allowed inside, so this is all you will get to see. It’s worth a stop if you’re in town, though. The ceiling and walls are hand painted with a very intricate design.

After the synagogue, we decided to going back to Santa Croce, after finding out that good old Galileo was buried inside. This time photos were allowed.

 

Here’s Galileo. Nearby you can also find Machiavelli, Michelangelo, and Dante.

 

 

 

Outside is a nice courtyard that we wandered through a bit. We were on a schedule, though, so not too much lingering.

 

 

You can’t quite tell it in this shot, but the ceiling of this little chapel is decorated with pictures of Jesus reading bedtime stories to animals. The cow seems particularly delighted by the experience.

 

Next we crossed the river and headed uphill for a view of the area we’d been roaming for two days. Along the way we found someone had embellished a dead-end sign.

 

 

Going up to get a view means you need to climb a lot of steps.

Here it is: the pay off!

 

 

 

 

 

There’s yet another David copy up there, bronze this time.

 

After checking out the view for a while, Yen looked to the surrounding hills. Could we get even higher?

 

Along the way, we stopped off in a little garden.

 

 

 

Then up up up.

 

 

Finally we remembered the time. We had a reservation at Uffizi gallery and needed to get going. Along the way, Yen captured this scene. You really can’t be Italian without a scooter. As we were leaving Rome, we found a place thast rented Vespas. That would have been fun.

Uffizi doesn’t allow photos either. This was a sneak attack. It’s a big gallery, and we were suitably impressed. But we definitely were both beginning to suffer a bit of Stendhal Syndrome.

 

We found this little patio in the gallery. Seems a lot of people use it as a refuge.

 

 

You know what’s a great cure for Stendhal Syndrome? Gelato. Look how happy I am! That’s a rice (yes, really) and chocolate-orange for me, and a rice and green tea for Yen.

Then back to Duomo for the late afternoon light Yen loves so much.

I used Yelp and TripAdvisor to find many of our restaurant choices. One in Florence was full of overjoyed anecdotes, a place called Tito’s improbably run by a man called Bobo. Off we went.

 

See who else has eaten there? Tons of such photos all over Bobo’s walls.

 

 

Yen knew he was in the right place when he saw this sign.

And here’s Bobo himself, feeding us shots of his homemade limoncello. A very naughty man.